Water Conservation

Person holding an Earth with a faucet dripping water

Updated Urban Water Management and Water Shortage Contingency Plans

The City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 9, 2021, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be reached, to receive comments on the 2020 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) and Water Shortage Contingency Plan (WSCP). The City’s draft UWMP and draft WSCP can be viewed on the City's Water Page.

Level 1 Conservation Restrictions

  • Watering Days: The City is currently under Level 1 Water Conservation restrictions. Watering or irrigating is allowed Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday ONLY. The watering restrictions are tied to the current water conservation level. Restrictions are not seasonal, they are only changed as a result of a conservation level change.
  • Obligation to Fix Leaks, Breaks, or Malfunctions: Excessive use, loss, or escape of water through leaks, breaks, or other malfunctions in the water user's plumbing must be repaired within 48 hours unless arrangements have been made with the City.
  • Current Water Conservation Ordinance (PDF) (Summary)

Please see the Signal Hill Municipal Code for complete information on the City's Water Conservation ordinances. If you have additional questions about Water Conservation restrictions, please contact Public Works at 562-989-7351.

Water Conservation September 2021

Current Water Supply Alert

The City of Signal Hill is serviced by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. In response to the extreme drought conditions throughout California, Metropolitan's Board of Directors declared a Water Supply Alert in mid-August 2021, calling for consumers and businesses to voluntarily reduce their water use and help preserve the region's storage reserves. The board’s action urges residents, businesses and agencies in Metropolitan’s 5,200 square-mile service area to lower the region’s water demand to stave off more severe actions in the future, which could include restricting water supplies to Metropolitan’s 26 member agencies.

Tips to save water are available at bewaterwise.com, where Southern Californians can also access rebates that provide funding to swap appliances for more efficient models or transform grass into more sustainable California Friendly® and Native plant gardens.

Resources

More information on local water restrictions and conservation efforts:

Careful water management is essential to ensure a reliable minimum supply of water to meet current and future water supply needs. Active water conservation measures must be taken at all times, not just during droughts.

For some suggestions on how to maintain your lawn and conserve water, please watch the following video: Grass Can Always Be Greener. You may decide that you'd like to reduce water consumption by opting to remove your lawn and replace it with native plant material. 

Let's not forget about our trees during the drought. For tips on how to save your landscape trees while conserving water, please read Water Wise Tree Care. It is possible to save water and trees (PDF)!

Parkway Landscape Guide and No-Fee Permit

Landscaping the parkway in front of your home with drought tolerant vegetation in combination with, or without, hardscape materials is one way to conserve water. Water Conservation and Landscaping are important partners.

Please see the City's Parkway Landscape Guide (PDF) for some attractive and water conserving ideas. Once you have a plan, contact Public Works for a No-Fee Encroachment Parkway Permit and submit it along with your plan to the Public Works Department for review.

Los Angeles County hosts a series of FREE Smart Gardening Workshops. Sign up for a workshop in your area to learn more about drought tolerant gardening in their beginner, intermediate, and advanced level classes.